Posts Tagged ‘app’

As reported by MacStories, Apple today updated its terms and conditions from the Austrian, Greek, and ItalianiTunes Stores to include new information for the iTunes Match service. With this move, the Cupertino-based corporation is bringing iTunes Match to additional countries today, including the three aforementioned and maybe more.

According to Federico Viticci of MacStories, iTunes Match is apparently accepting new accounts from Austria, Greece, and Italy. It is not known if there are other countries receiving the service, but if you happen to see it when browsing around, please let us know in the comments.

iTunes Match is available 37 countries worldwide today, according to a support document published by Apple. It is rumored that the service will roll out in Japan soon as well, but there’s no specified date for it.

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If you have been waiting patiently to get your hands on the latest MacBook Air or Pro models with Intel’s new Ivy Bridge processors, be prepared to wait a little longer. During a first quarter earnings conference call, Intel’s CEO confirmed that the chip maker will launch its Ivy Bridge processors in two phases.

 

“The first versions of Ivy Bridge that we’re shipping are quad-cores,” CEO Paul Otellini said during the call today. “And then the second launch of the products is the dual core, which is the mainstream notebooks,” he added.

 

The chip maker will first roll out its quad-core Ivy Bridge processors, which are expected to be unveiled next Monday, April 23. Subsequently, the company will release dual-core models for mainstream notebooks, which likely includes the MacBook Air, in a second wave. According to CNET, that second launch is likely to take place in June, so don’t be too surprised if the remainder of April and May pass by without any MacBook Air or Pro refresh.

 

In a peculiar move, 9to5Mac reports that Apple is instructing Genius Bars at their retail stores to replace white iPhone 4 16 GB models that have issues with refurbished iPhone 4S models — provided the store doesn’t have any of the actual iPhone 4s in stock. This means that if you’re iPhone has an issue and the genius concludes it needs to be replaced, you’ll get a free upgrade to the iPhone 4S, which was recently released in October of 2011.

 

Apple is apparently telling their Genius Bars to do this unusual exchange because of supply constraints on the white iPhone 4 16 GB. Either that particular model is extremely popular, or Apple is having some sort of difficulty producing the exact model. In any case, now may be the time to bring in your phone if it’s been having any major issue and you’ve been procrastinating about it. Do understand that your local store may not be out of stock, so you’d be taking a chance.

 

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Marketplace reporter Rob Schmitz is the second reporter ever to get an inside look at Foxconn, the manufacturing plant where Apple’s products are made. Today, Schmitz posted a video showing our first-ever look at the assembly process of an iPad as it goes down the assembly line at the Foxconn plant in Shanghai, China. It is interesting to look at how machines streamline some of the process. Schmitz also noted a few other interesting points, such as workers switching positions every few days while making $14 a day when first starting.

Apple has added a new page to its website that shows off different ways that professionals use Final Cut Pro X for their video editing needs. Final Cut Pro X can be purchased from the Mac App Store for $299.99 for first time purchasers, and is also available as a free update for existing users. A 30-day free trial of Final Cut Pro X is also available.

 

In January, Apple released a free update to Final Cut Pro X, bringing over a half-dozen new features to the video editing application. The update introduced multi-cam editing that automatically syncs up to 64 angles of video and photos, advanced chroma keying for handling complex adjustments right in the app, and enhanced XML for a richer interchange with third party apps and plug-ins that are supported by Final Cut Pro X.

 

Following the mockups of the 4-inch iPhone 5 this morning, one of our awesome readers, Spencer Caldwell, made this beautiful mockup (above). Spencer took this morning’s idea and added more pixels vertically, while keeping the pixels the same horizontally as the iPhone 4S (640-by-1152 pixels). As for the home button on the device, Spencer took the Photo Stream leak from last summer (below) and implemented it on the device. On a larger iPhone like this, it definitely looks better over the circular version.

Chipworks today published their teardown of the 1080p Apple TV’s A5 chip and they have found that it’s been shrunk in size from 45 nm to just 32 nm. This is actually the same exact chip that’s in Apple’s iPhone 4S from last October, though its much smaller. It doesn’t make much sense for Apple to have such a small chip within their most inexpensive product though — even the new iPad’s A5X chip is 45 nm, so it’s unclear why they’d spend extra effort to make it smaller. It’s also important to note that this is the first iOS device Apple has used a 32 nm chip in.

 

The strangest thing that Chipworks found in their teardown was that the A5 chip is actually dual-core, even though Apple labeled it as single-core on the device’s technical specifications page. Sadly, the second core is disabled, meaning that there’s no way to get that extra power. Chipworks says that the reason for it being disabled could “Either Apple is only utilizing one core or they are binning parts.”

” The new A5 processor die is not a single core processor, but contains a dual core processor. Either Apple is only utilizing one core or they are binning parts. Parts binning is a common process in semiconductors where devices are segregated (binned) based on meeting a subset of the overall requirements, in this case they could disable the “bad” core, this increases the usable die per wafer, lowering the cost.