Posts Tagged ‘app store’

When you hear stories about independent App Store developers becoming extremely successful, you might think that the App Store is a viable business and something that can easily provide you with extra income. But, according to a recent survey by marketing firm App Promo, it is actually quite difficult to release apps that become successful.

The survey shows that “59 percent of apps don’t break even, and 80 percent of developers can’t sustain a business on their apps alone.” The fact that there is over 600,000 apps available on the App Store could be a contributing reason for the difficulties that developers face, since there is limited visibility for the apps that they release. That is, of course, unless they are dedicated to an  extensive — and expensive — marketing pitch.

“Over the years I have seen visibility of applications I’ve worked on greatly reduced,” developer Pat McCarron told Ars. “Right now your app is likely not going to be found if you never break the Top 100 or Top 200 lists. Users won’t navigate forever down the list of top apps to find yours sitting lonely at the bottom.”

Rogue Amoeba’s Paul Kafasis agreed that the App Store has become more of a lottery, and less a chance for small developers to succeed along with well-established companies.

“The App Store is very much like the lottery, and very few companies are topping the charts,” Kafasis told Ars. “It’s a hit-based business. Much like music or book sales, there are a few huge winners, a bigger handful of minor successes, and a whole lot of failures.”

To release an app to the App Store, you must be an official registered developer with Apple, a program that costs $100 to enroll in. Have you ever released, or considered developing, an App Store app?

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As reported by MacStories, Apple today updated its terms and conditions from the Austrian, Greek, and ItalianiTunes Stores to include new information for the iTunes Match service. With this move, the Cupertino-based corporation is bringing iTunes Match to additional countries today, including the three aforementioned and maybe more.

According to Federico Viticci of MacStories, iTunes Match is apparently accepting new accounts from Austria, Greece, and Italy. It is not known if there are other countries receiving the service, but if you happen to see it when browsing around, please let us know in the comments.

iTunes Match is available 37 countries worldwide today, according to a support document published by Apple. It is rumored that the service will roll out in Japan soon as well, but there’s no specified date for it.

If you are curious about how environmentally friendly the iPad is, the extremely long infographic just ahead will answer all of your questions. The infographic also provides information about the impact that iTunes and iCloud have on the environment, Apple’s working conditions at its overseas supply chains, recycling options for the iPad, and more. Check it out just ahead.

Apple this afternoon seeded a new developer preview of their upcoming OS X Mountain Lion release to developers. This new build is at version 12A178q (previously 12A154q) and there aren’t any major changes that anyone has noticed just yet. However, Apple has included a large list of known issues in this build, which may include most, but not all, of what you can experience after installing it.

OS X Mountain Lion is scheduled for release sometime this summer, according to Apple. Mac refreshes have been rumored to come with it, but there’s no official word on that just yet. In fact, some have claimed that Apple will release a new MacBook Air later this month.

To acquire OS X Mountain Lion Developer Preview 3, you must be a registered Apple developer. If you are, then head to the Apple Developer Member Center and grab this new build while it’s still hot. Let us know if you find any major — or even minor — changes!

For now, here’s the list of known issues that you should keep in mind when testing things out:

– On systems with FileVault enabled, canceling the restart to the Mountain Lion Developer Preview 3 Installer may leave your system unable to present a password dialog at boot time. You can repair the problem by holding down command-R to boot to the Recovery OS and then using Disk Utility to unlock and Repair your volume.
– Installing OS X 10.8 over 10.7.2 or earlier with FileVault turned on may fail
– Pre-Lion FileVault user accounts are not supported in this Developer Preview
– Some Apple menu items such as Restart may not work when a sandboxed app is in the foreground
– iTunes no longer syncs Notes
– Mail’s photo browser cannot access the iPhoto library
– Back to My Mac doesn’t work for the first 5 minutes after rebooting
– DVD Player may not launch after inserting a DVD on some systems
– Most help topics are unavailable in this Developer Preview
– In the Recovery HD:
– Some icons may be missing
– Network Utility’s Lookup pane does not work
– Time Machine restoration via a AFP share does not work
– Restoring from a Time Machine backup via AFP does not work
– Migration from a Time Machine backup that excludes paths such as /System may yield an unusable system
– Brightness settings may change unexpectedly after reboot
– Display brightness may be dim after sleep or reboot
– If Mail is hidden at logout time, it may not be correctly relaunched during a subsequent login but will appear to be running
– Java applets may not work in Safari
– QuickTime screen recordings may produce corrupted videos or cause an exception when run on machines with NVDIA graphics

 

If you have been waiting patiently to get your hands on the latest MacBook Air or Pro models with Intel’s new Ivy Bridge processors, be prepared to wait a little longer. During a first quarter earnings conference call, Intel’s CEO confirmed that the chip maker will launch its Ivy Bridge processors in two phases.

 

“The first versions of Ivy Bridge that we’re shipping are quad-cores,” CEO Paul Otellini said during the call today. “And then the second launch of the products is the dual core, which is the mainstream notebooks,” he added.

 

The chip maker will first roll out its quad-core Ivy Bridge processors, which are expected to be unveiled next Monday, April 23. Subsequently, the company will release dual-core models for mainstream notebooks, which likely includes the MacBook Air, in a second wave. According to CNET, that second launch is likely to take place in June, so don’t be too surprised if the remainder of April and May pass by without any MacBook Air or Pro refresh.

 

iBooks is an amazing way to download and read books. iBooks includes the iBookstore, where you can download the latestbestsellingbooks or your favorite classics day or night. Browse your library on a beau

iBooks 2.1.1 addresses an issue which prompted you to sign-in with your Apple ID at unexpected times. If you experienced this issue, please open iBooks after updating. 

This version also contains minor stability and performance improvements.

 

In a peculiar move, 9to5Mac reports that Apple is instructing Genius Bars at their retail stores to replace white iPhone 4 16 GB models that have issues with refurbished iPhone 4S models — provided the store doesn’t have any of the actual iPhone 4s in stock. This means that if you’re iPhone has an issue and the genius concludes it needs to be replaced, you’ll get a free upgrade to the iPhone 4S, which was recently released in October of 2011.

 

Apple is apparently telling their Genius Bars to do this unusual exchange because of supply constraints on the white iPhone 4 16 GB. Either that particular model is extremely popular, or Apple is having some sort of difficulty producing the exact model. In any case, now may be the time to bring in your phone if it’s been having any major issue and you’ve been procrastinating about it. Do understand that your local store may not be out of stock, so you’d be taking a chance.

 

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Marketplace reporter Rob Schmitz is the second reporter ever to get an inside look at Foxconn, the manufacturing plant where Apple’s products are made. Today, Schmitz posted a video showing our first-ever look at the assembly process of an iPad as it goes down the assembly line at the Foxconn plant in Shanghai, China. It is interesting to look at how machines streamline some of the process. Schmitz also noted a few other interesting points, such as workers switching positions every few days while making $14 a day when first starting.